NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet backs ban of domestic violence offenders from dating apps


Dominic Perrottet has backed rules that could stop domestic abusers from joining dating apps.

The NSW Premier said a meeting between NSW Police, domestic violence organizations and state and federal ministers planned for Wednesday would “address” the issue, as well as a new trial allowing men and women to see whether the his partner has been convicted of guilt. domestic violence.

While the exact details of how the 12-month trial, called Right to Ask, is yet to be announced, NSW Police could reveal information such as confirmed cases of physical and sexual assault, property damage, stalking , intimidation and AVO breaches, NSW said. Natalie Ward, Minister for Women’s Safety.

Perrottet said: “I think it has to be changed. My opinion is that it has to be changed.”

whether “men with convictions should be allowed on dating apps”

“I can’t see how people who have a domestic violence conviction can access these apps.

“Ultimately, I think it’s best done nationally.”

The calls for background checks on dating apps came after the recent death of 31-year-old Sydney teacher Dannielle Finlay-Jones.

The Sydney woman was found with significant head injuries in a friend’s room after spending the night with Ashley Gaddie, a man she allegedly met on a dating app.

Since he was charged with his alleged murder, it was later revealed that former associates of Mr. Gaddie had five AVOs placed against him since 2016. The case is before the courts.

NSW Women’s Safety Minister Natalie Ward said she hoped the new NSW trial would address safety issues that can arise from online dating.

While the exact details of how the 12-month trial, called Right to Ask, is yet to be announced, NSW Police could reveal information such as confirmed cases of physical and sexual assault, property damage, stalking , intimidation and AVO violations. People could also access this information through an online portal or telephone service.

“With the prevalence of dating apps and online dating, you just don’t have that support network around you,” Ms Ward said on Monday morning.

“Twenty years ago, you used to know someone through a friend or through a network and you had someone to refer to. Now, you’re meeting someone online and you don’t know the first thing about them.

“It gives that information about their history: if they have a violent past, if they have domestic violence offenses.”

The “Right to Ask” trial could expose the couple’s violent past

On Monday, the NSW government also announced a 12-month trial, called Right to Ask, which would allow people to check whether the person they are dating has a history of domestic violence or abusive offending.

Individuals applying to use the Service will be required to adhere to strict privacy controls, including completing a legal declaration and complying with identification controls.

There will be strict penalties for malicious apps.

Perrottet said the plan will be worth trying, even if it “saves a life.”

“There are too many heartbreaking stories of women and men being seriously injured or killed in circumstances where the perpetrators had a history of domestic and violent criminal offenses they were unaware of,” he said in a statement.

“None of us wants to see a loved one scarred by domestic violence and wishing they had known their partner’s story sooner.

“We cannot continue to kill women in our community, so we must have new approaches, new thinking and new policies to support our record funding to support domestic violence.”

Scheme hosted by DV organisations

Full Stop Australia CEO Hayley Foster welcomed the move and said the plan allowed potential victims “some degree of agency”.

The sexual, domestic or family violence support organization will be among the groups working with the NSW Government to design the scheme and oversee its implementation during the 12-month trial.

“We are delighted that the NSW Government is taking very decisive action to ensure that people who may be at risk of being targeted by a domestic and family violence predator can have more informed choices when they are in a relationship with someone they may not know “, he told NCA NewsWire.

“It’s about making sure people have opportunities to get that information, to make informed decisions, and to put more power in the hands of people who may be the target of a violent or abusive partner.”

While Ms Foster says the scheme is “an important piece of the puzzle” to reducing domestic and sexual violence, she is also calling for the implementation of a national domestic violence register, or at least NSW-wide.

It also supported wrinkle conversations about security measures on dating apps.

Such a register could catalog people who have been convicted of multiple domestic violence offences, serious crimes or who have multiple AVOs against them from multiple ex-partners, and would allow agencies such as dating apps to “ detection of people and create more security”. spaces,” said Mrs. Foster.

Originally published as NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet backs ban of domestic violence offenders from dating apps

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